She was kept captive at a Hidatsa village near present-day Washburn, North Dakota.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association of the early twentieth century adopted her as a symbol of women's worth and independence, erecting several statues and plaques in her memory, and doing much to spread the story of her accomplishments.

Posthumously, in 1977, she was inducted into the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame, in Fort Worth, Texas.

On July 6, Clark recorded "The Indian woman informed me that she had been in this plain frequently and knew it well...

She said we would discover a gap in the mountains in our direction..." which is now Gibbons Pass.

They used Sacagawea to interpret and discovered that the tribe's chief, Cameahwait, was her brother.

Lewis recorded their reunion in his journal: Shortly after Capt.

The Shoshone agreed to barter horses to the group, and to provide guides to lead them over the cold and barren Rocky Mountains.

The trip was so hard that they were reduced to eating tallow candles to survive.

Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark built Fort Mandan.

They interviewed several trappers who might be able to interpret or guide the expedition up the Missouri River in the springtime.

When they descended into the more temperate regions on the other side, Sacagawea helped to find and cook camas roots to help them regain their strength.