This is, again, not the holy grail of everything ever made by everyone.Still, I’m lucky enough to have been able to try almost everything made by all the major trainer companies this year, at least at the mid to upper end (I don’t tend to review the 93 different models of trainers from to 0).

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My goal being to wrap up all the new wearable reviews by that timeframe.

Trainer reviews will happen as final versions of trainers come in. First and foremost, I only recommend trainers I’ve actually used.

Similarly, the European markets generally get a better deal on European-made products (Tacx/Elite), while US consumers tend to get better pricing on US made products (Wahoo).

All of which ignores the reality of MAP (Minimum Advertising Pricing), which exists in the US and doesn’t exist in Europe.

It’s not that I think that all non-technology trainers are the same (cause they aren’t…well…except that most are), but it’s because that’s just what I happen to review the most here.

There’s a lot of things to look for in a trainer – but some are applicable across the board from a sub-0 unit to a

There’s a lot of things to look for in a trainer – but some are applicable across the board from a sub-$100 unit to a $1,500 unit. The more plastic involved, the less likely it’s going to last over time. I’ll start with the ones that leverage a skewer of some sort and don’t require removal of the wheel.There are some trainers that I’ve used hundreds of times, and others just once or twice.My minimum bar for inclusion in this post is having ridden on it at least once.I had to change my price bucketing last year, and I’m slightly doing the same thing this year.My purpose isn’t so much moving the goalposts, as it is making the field more logical.I keep it simple and explain exactly why I feel a given way.

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There’s a lot of things to look for in a trainer – but some are applicable across the board from a sub-$100 unit to a $1,500 unit. The more plastic involved, the less likely it’s going to last over time. I’ll start with the ones that leverage a skewer of some sort and don’t require removal of the wheel.

There are some trainers that I’ve used hundreds of times, and others just once or twice.

My minimum bar for inclusion in this post is having ridden on it at least once.

I had to change my price bucketing last year, and I’m slightly doing the same thing this year.

My purpose isn’t so much moving the goalposts, as it is making the field more logical.

I keep it simple and explain exactly why I feel a given way.

||

There’s a lot of things to look for in a trainer – but some are applicable across the board from a sub-$100 unit to a $1,500 unit. The more plastic involved, the less likely it’s going to last over time. I’ll start with the ones that leverage a skewer of some sort and don’t require removal of the wheel.

There are some trainers that I’ve used hundreds of times, and others just once or twice.

My minimum bar for inclusion in this post is having ridden on it at least once.

I had to change my price bucketing last year, and I’m slightly doing the same thing this year.

,500 unit. The more plastic involved, the less likely it’s going to last over time. I’ll start with the ones that leverage a skewer of some sort and don’t require removal of the wheel.

There are some trainers that I’ve used hundreds of times, and others just once or twice.

My minimum bar for inclusion in this post is having ridden on it at least once.

I had to change my price bucketing last year, and I’m slightly doing the same thing this year.